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Coping With Working In This Summer Heat

Coping With Working In This Summer Heat

Coping With Working In This Summer Heat

As you and many of your colleagues carry on working in this summer’s heat, the question is often asked, “Is there a maximum temperature for working?”

The short answer is no, there are no regulations governing the temperature for domestic working. The only stipulation is that it has to be “reasonable.”  So what can you do to make life more comfortable?  It’s largely a matter of common sense, plus possibly a little help from your boss.

  • Remove unnecessary layers of clothing where possible. You may be subject to wearing a dress code, and if it is suitable for normal temperatures, perhaps ask your boss if it is possible to wear lighter clothes until temperatures drop
  • Use a pedestal fan to increase air movement
  • Use window blinds (if available) to cut down on the heating effects of the sun
  • Drink plenty of water (avoid decaffeinated or carbonated drinks) if possible
  • Work away from direct sunlight or sources of radiant heat
  • Take regular breaks if you feel the heat is making you uncomfortable and, if necessary, check with your boss that this is OK
  • If working outside wear a head covering and apply sunscreen

Although the current situation does not stipulate maximum working temperatures, this may change. In recent weeks there have been two moves to change the law in this regard:

Firstly two large unions, GMB and the TUC have both called on the government to introduce a legal limit on how hot it can be in a workplace.  The GMB wants to see a maximum workplace temperature of 25C enshrined in law, while the TUC wants there to be a requirement to stop work if indoor temperatures reach 30c, or 27C for those doing strenuous jobs.

Secondly, the issue has recently been raised in parliament with a number of MPs recently backing the call for a maximum workplace temperature via an early day motion.  The motion states that if a maximum temperature of 30C is reached, or 27C for strenuous work, then employers should have a statutory duty to introduce control measures, such as ventilation or move staff away from windows and sources of heat.

We will keep you updated with developments.

The Graham Agency, working with you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Graham Agency, working with you.