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Keep Your Views To Yourself, It’s Safer!

Keep Your Views To Yourself, It’s Safer!

At one time employers wouldn’t think twice about giving advice to an employee. The response could well be, “Thanks” Mind your own business,” or “Well that’s really up to me isn’t it”.

How times change. Today, the response could just as easily be that the employer faces an employment tribunal with costs awarded.

A case in point revolves around a female marine biologist who had worked at Cumbria University since 2015.

Caroline Law was told she was being made redundant by the University “which had a policy of protecting “vulnerable”

employees during the pandemic 2020, two months before she was due to start maternity leave.

In essence, Law claimed that being pregnant made her vulnerable to Covid-19 terms, but this was rejected by the University’s Chief Operating Officer.

Her boss, Rachel Lawthian was alleged to have said that Law might find work she could do at home while the baby slept. Additionally, if she worked hard she would get “good Karma”.

In its ruling, the Tribunal said that when Law was informed of her redundancy, Lawthian volunteered advice about securing child benefits, sourcing second-hand baby clothes, and techniques of bathing a baby,

The tribunal said that while the comments were “well-intentioned” they left Law wondering if her redundancy was linked to her pregnancy.

Judge Joanne Dunlop, criticised the rejection of her being “vulnerable” through pregnancy, that the decision and comments amounted to unfavourable treatment on the grounds of pregnancy.

A hearing to determine compensation will be heard at a later date.

The Graham Agency, keeping you informed.

End